25 Things That Happened in January That You Missed

25 Things That Happened in January That You Missed


Ever wish you could have a list of interesting articles to read, curated by really cool and knowledgable people? You know, people just like you. We knew it! Luckily, you’ve stumbled upon just that: our January roundup of the 25 most “interest pique-ey” articles that we think you might want to know about.

“The saying goes there’s no business like show business. And even in the midst of a global pandemic, the Big Game must go on.” – Digiday

“[Consumers] expect for brands to understand what they’ve bought in the past and help them to determine what they should buy next, based on all the data that they’ve consciously shared with them by engaging with their sites and channels.” – Forbes

“Halts in production of new and existing shows, delays in fall TV season premieres and an overall sense of time lost became realities as Americans were forced to recalibrate to spending more time at home for the good of public health and their communities. And in all likelihood, the atypical nature of the year will be profound enough to drive permanent shifts in consumer behavior, including media consumption.” – Nielsen

“Google allows searchers to submit questions that go unanswered and publishers can then create content to match it. Now this feature seems to have been expanded to US based publishers.” – SE Roundtable

“French subscription diaper brand Little Big Change and agency Buzzman Paris are running a social media campaign that asks parents to take a felt-tip, write “2020” on their baby’s (preferably full) diaper, and post the photo on Instagram with the hashtag #LittleBigChange.” – AdAge

“Samsung imagines your fridge as a blocky, Piet Mondrian painting. You can choose the size and shape, and even the color, to perfectly match your walls. And this customization won’t just be applied to your fridge. All of your appliances, from your dishwasher to your air purifiers, will soon be elevated to furniture status.” – FastCompany

“The retailer is teaming up with “fashion-loving TikTok creators” to produce shoppable livestreams.” – Adweek

“There are people who love flowers, and people who would much rather receive bouquets of fried chicken.” – Design Taxi

Watch the video of this crusty, cheesy, very crave-able creation.

“For more than a decade, scientists at Purina had been creating and refining a nutritional approach that could significantly reduce cat allergens. Now that innovation is available to cat owners everywhere, in the form of Purina Pro Plan LiveClear: the world’s first and only cat food shown to reduce allergens in cat hair and dander.” – USA Today

“If you’re a stranger to the world of the world’s largest video game livestreaming platform, then read on to see more Twitch statistics, including the latest viewing figures, demographic user breakdowns, and how Twitch shares its revenue.” – Business of Apps

“Commercial drone use for deliveries and services cleared a major hurdle in the U.S. with new rules allowing the devices to fly over populated areas for the first time and requirements for tracking them to address safety and security concerns.” – DigitalCommerce 360

“Dick’s is one of several retail chains turning to on-demand platforms to help fulfill online orders.

A recent example is Best Buy Co Inc. In November, the electronics retailer said shoppers across the U.S. could place orders at Instacart.com/Best-Buy or in the Instacart app for hundreds of products. Instacart will fulfill orders from local Best Buy stores and deliver within a designated window that day. ” – DigitalCommerce360

“It’s a concept design with a glossy outside shell made of waterproof and scratch-resistant recycled plastic, which is transparent to allow for lip-reading and seeing facial cues when you chat with people.” – The Verge

“If there were ever any doubts that the cannabis industry could thrive during the pandemic-there were, believe it or not-let the following results show just how wrong the skeptics were and how high the category flew this year.” – Adweek

“From digisexuality to mycelium and the magic of mushrooms, our global experts reveal what 2021 has in store” – WGSN

“Dynamic content, changing product recommendations and responsive design are just some of the hurdles eCommerce email marketers deal with every day. Lucky for you, we’ve outlined our top best practice do’s and don’ts so you can be sure to design triggered email templates that are both beautiful and effective.” – Bluecore

“Hotels that cannot provide more secluded spots or offer increased booking flexibility could be at risk of losing out even further in 2021” – Lodging Magazine

“The aim is to figure out how we can serve our guests with the right message at the right time but using less or maybe smarter data, whether that’s non-personally identifiable information or using contextual targeting,” said Angelina Gosal, Subway’s head of marketing in the U.K. and Ireland.” – Digiday

“Apple has confirmed a date for the anti-tracking feature to arrive-or at least a timescale. The iPhone maker chose Data Privacy Day (January 28) to announce that ATT will be coming to an iOS 14 update, in “early spring” 2021.” – Forbes

“Spotify ended 2020 on a high note by adding a record 30 million premium subscribers over the year, along with a further 44m who signed up for a lower tier of service.” – The Drum

“At some point in 2021 employees will return to the office to meet and collaborate physically with their colleagues. Yet the office they go back to – even for just a few days a week – might look a lot different to the one they left.” – Digiday

“To help local farmers, Burger King has bought 200 extra tons of potatoes and is giving them out to those who have ordered a burger and fries meal.” – Design Taxi

“GA4 is built with the future in mind, so scalability and growth have been factored into the new design, along with a wider focus on tracking the complete user journey, as opposed to splitting user interaction into sessions, devices or platforms like Universal Analytics.” – The Drum

“Less is more when it comes to the attempt from fast food franchise Subway to reshape media spending around the contours of privacy. Its marketers are trying to build an addressable media strategy using non-addressable data.” – Digiday

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